Suits and boots: Reserve readiness exercise

Tech. Sgt. Lether Jones, 940th Aerospace Medicine Squadron medical administration, takes cover during an exercise Nov. 4 at Beale Air Force Base. Airmen stayed low to the ground after their location was hit with a mock strike. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Tara R. Abrahams)

Tech. Sgt. Lether Jones, 940th Aerospace Medicine Squadron medical administration, takes cover during an exercise Nov. 4 at Beale Air Force Base. Airmen stayed low to the ground after their location was hit with a mock strike. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Tara R. Abrahams)

Airmen assigned to the 38th Intelligence Squadron put on simulated M9 detector tape during an Ability to Survive and Operate exercise Nov. 4 at Beale Air Force Base, California. M9 detector tape is worn to detect the presence of liquid chemical agents, but does not identify which agents are present. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Tara R. Abrahams)

Airmen assigned to the 38th Intelligence Squadron put on simulated M9 detector tape during an Ability to Survive and Operate exercise Nov. 4 at Beale Air Force Base, California. M9 detector tape is worn to detect the presence of liquid chemical agents, but does not identify which agents are present. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Tara R. Abrahams)

Senior Airman Alex Lopez checks Staff Sgt. Victor Garcia’s gas mask and hood during an exercise Nov. 4 at Beale Air Force Base. Squadron. Both Airmen, assigned to the 940th Force Support Squadron, practiced readiness skills in the Ability to Survive and Operate exercise. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Tara R. Abrahams)

Senior Airman Alex Lopez checks Staff Sgt. Victor Garcia’s gas mask and hood during an exercise Nov. 4 at Beale Air Force Base. Squadron. Both Airmen, assigned to the 940th Force Support Squadron, practiced readiness skills in the Ability to Survive and Operate exercise. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Tara R. Abrahams)

A post-attack reconnaissance team investigates simulated chemical agent detector paper during an exercise Nov. 4 at Beale Air Force Base. The PAR team looked for hazardous agents in the air, as well as unexploded ordnance on the ground. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Tara R. Abrahams)

A post-attack reconnaissance team investigates simulated chemical agent detector paper during an exercise Nov. 4 at Beale Air Force Base. The PAR team looked for hazardous agents in the air, as well as unexploded ordnance on the ground. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Tara R. Abrahams)

Maj. Daniel Dillinger, 940th Aerospace Medicine Squadron optometry chief, helps Staff Sgt. Frankie Placeres, 940 AMDS medical administration, put on his gloves during an exercise Nov. 4 at Beale Air Force Base. The Ability to Survive and Operate exercise allowed Airmen to practice working while in chemical suits to prepare for potential threats. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Tara R. Abrahams)

Maj. Daniel Dillinger, 940th Aerospace Medicine Squadron optometry chief, helps Staff Sgt. Frankie Placeres, 940 AMDS medical administration, put on his gloves during an exercise Nov. 4 at Beale Air Force Base. The Ability to Survive and Operate exercise allowed Airmen to practice working while in chemical suits to prepare for potential threats. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Tara R. Abrahams)

Beale reservists take cover during the Ability to Survive and Operate exercise Nov. 4 at Beale Air Force Base. More than 90 reservists participated in the exercise during their unit training assembly weekend. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Tara R. Abrahams)

Beale reservists take cover during the Ability to Survive and Operate exercise Nov. 4 at Beale Air Force Base. More than 90 reservists participated in the exercise during their unit training assembly weekend. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Tara R. Abrahams)

Tech. Sgt. John Fergerson, a noncommisioned officer with the 940th Security Forces Squadron, explains the importance of the entry control point to Airmen during the Ability to Survive and Operate exercise Nov. 4 at Beale Air Force Base, California. Reservists from the 940th Air Refueling Wing and 38th Intelligence Squadron participated in the exercise. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Tara R. Abrahams)

Tech. Sgt. John Fergerson, a noncommisioned officer with the 940th Security Forces Squadron, explains the importance of the entry control point to Airmen during the Ability to Survive and Operate exercise Nov. 4 at Beale Air Force Base, California. Reservists from the 940th Air Refueling Wing and 38th Intelligence Squadron participated in the exercise. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Tara R. Abrahams)

BEALE AIR FORCE BASE, California --

More than 90 Beale reservists demonstrated their readiness capabilities in a simulated chemical environment during their unit training assembly Nov. 4 here.

 

The Ability to Survive and Operate exercise prepared Airmen for working in hostile locations by allowing them to practice in gas masks and protective suits.

 

“It was a great exercise,” said Senior Airman Ryan J. Heater, a services Airman with the 940th Force Support Squadron. “I learned how to cooperate with my wingman and peers in a situation that could tragically affect us as a whole.”

 

At the start of the exercise, participants suited up in overgarments, field gear and overboots for protection before, during and after a mock chemical attack.

 

As the exercise went on, the building was attacked by a simulated strike and the participants adjusted their gear for the heightened conditions. They put on gas masks, hoods and gloves in addition to the chemical suits they were wearing.

 

Following the strike, participants took turns being in post-attack reconnaissance teams. They searched for unexploded ordnance and performed their usual jobs.

 

Each unit developed its own objectives and performed its job in unfavorable conditions. Airmen were required to drive, give medical attention, conduct accountability and make sure their location was safe and secure.

 

“It went exceptionally well,” said Senior Master Sgt. Timothy W. Woods, 940th Inspector General Inspections superintendent and one of the exercise planners. “We covered 100 percent of our objectives and (job) requirements set by the units and at the wing level.”